Good to Great

A short but important piece from Dan Miller’s weekly newsletter.  Find Dan’s blog HERE.

There is a PBS special running right now on the music of David Foster (Hit Man – David Foster and Friends). As the hosts asked him about his early years in music, one response jumped out at me. David said he loved music as a child and his parents allowed him to take lessons in classical music. But David said: “I was good, but not great.” He went on to explain that if he had been a better musician he would likely have ended up as an anonymous face in some orchestra. Not being great forced him to look for other ways to be involved in music. So he writes and produces for other musicians. It has been said that Foster’s songs have made “many famous singers into superstars.” Many of his songs have become well known through the voices of Celine Dion, Barbra Streisand, Andrea Bocelli, Josh Groban, Whitney Houston, Madonna, Micheal Buble, and Boz Scaggs. And his own fame and fortune has far surpassed what he could have possibly hoped for as a “great” musician.

In The Millionaire Mind author Thomas Stanley looks at the common characteristics of people who have ended up extremely wealthy. Their average GPA is 2.7. Why isn’t it that all 4.0 students become wildly successful? Maybe their “greatness” came too easily and they missed the benefits of the struggle.

If “greatness” has not come easily for you have you given up the pursuit and settled for mediocrity? Or have you looked for alternative approaches for success anyway?

Maybe “greatness” that comes too easily is itself an obstacle. We’ve all seen athletes, musicians, writers, and speakers who were so naturally great they never had to exercise the discipline to survive the hard times – and quickly faded into oblivion.

Maybe not being “great” is your biggest hidden asset.

Dan Miller, President of 48 Days, LLC, in Franklin, TN, and Founder of The 212° Connection, specializes in creative thinking for increased personal and business success.

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